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Tag Archives: Canadian Northern Railway

CNoR/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision MP 37.6

Video of the former Canadian Northern Railway/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision near Macdiarmid/Rocky Bay FN, ON. Features the 1924 bridge over the Postagoni River.

Active, 1914-2005.

 
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Posted by on July 4, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway, Video

 

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CNoR/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision MP 37.1 (Macdiarmid Tunnel)

Video of the former Canadian Northern Railway/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision near Macdiarmid/Rocky Bay FN, ON. Features a 1000-foot tunnel known as the Macdiarmid or Jumbo’s Cove Tunnel.

Active, 1914-2005.

 
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Posted by on July 3, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway, Video

 

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CNoR/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision MP 106.6-109 II

Video of the former Canadian Northern Railway/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision east of Pearl, ON. Features several embankments, rock cuts and an old concrete culvert.

Part 2 of 2.

Active, 1914-2005. For more information, please visit:

 
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Posted by on June 23, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway, Video

 

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CNoR/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision MP 106.6-109 I

Video of the former Canadian Northern Railway/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision east of Pearl, ON. Features several long embankments and an old concrete culvert.

Part 1 of 2.

Active, 1914-2005.

 
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Posted by on June 22, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway, Video

 

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Well, at least Mother Nature is sympathetic!

“The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away.” I think most people have heard that biblical quote, even if they are not particularly religious or Christian. I’m a practicing Catholic, but honestly, I had to look up where the quote came from, which by the way is in Book of Job if you care to know. Sorry, I’m not always up to speed to my Old Testament scripture. Anyway, the reason why I brought it up was that it encapsulates, at least for some of us, our current situation. I know, cryptic as always. I will get to the point if you read on.

Hey kids, it’s almost June! This whole pandemic has turned the calendar into a blur of dates. I generally know which day of the week it is, but I’m having a difficult time keeping track of the dates. This means we’re now two and half months into this COVID imposed quarantine, which has turned everyone’s lives upside down. I’m still teaching from home, and will continue to do so until the end of June as the province has announced that we will not be returning to the classroom until September at the earliest. It’s still a struggle, as these online lessons do not do the curriculum any justice, and the students have begun to shutdown. In a regular year this always happens, but the pandemic has made everything worse since they don’t have to actually be in a classroom. Hopefully I can make it through the next few weeks without losing my marbles!

So the one thing that has been helpful is the one thing I always gripe about…yup, the weather. It’s almost like Mother Nature feels sorry for us and has decided to cut us some slack with some warm temperatures and generally sunny days. After a cool start to the month, May has been fairly warm, with some hot days and mostly rain free. That lack of precipitation does have some drawbacks, mainly the imposing of a restricted fire zone because of the dry conditions. That sadly means no open fires in backyards or at camps. The good with the bad right? The Lord giveth…

Now speaking of camp, it is that time of the year. For anyone new, camp is the term we use here in northwestern Ontario to describe our cottage, cabin or lake property. My wife and I are lucky to have inherited her parents camp, which is really like a house, so we have another place to be during this time. Usually the Victoria Day long weekend (third weekend in May) is typically the start of camping season for most people around here and we were no exception. We’ve spent the last few weekends out there, which really helps break up the monotony of being at home all the time. We recently got internet at our place, which is only available in turtle-speed DSL, but it helps take some of the pressure off our cellular data. It also allows us to do some of our school work while we are there; as we move more into June, we might be working more from there than usual.

Camp sunset, May 2020.

Camp sunrise, May 2020.

As I mentioned in previous posts, all of this time at home and no activities for the kids has given me more time to get out and do many railway related hiking. I’ve pretty much shutdown all writing work on my book, but I did do a number of online presentations via YouTube during April and May. You can watch them here if you are interested.

Now, back to the hiking thing. In my last post I mentioned that I was going to do some exploring around North Lake Station for the first time in 9 years. I was very excited for the visit, as North Lake was the first place I encountered the railway. Unfortunately, I left there very disappointed for two reasons. The first, was the weather. I was actually hoping for more clouds than sun, since I would be filming in a very heavily treed area and the clouds help to even the light so you can see better. The second and more important let down, was what I found. The North Lake station was built in 1907 and abandoned in 1923. It was still standing in the 1970s but sadly time caught up to it and it fell into ruin. When I first saw the remains in 1990, the station wasn’t more than a pile of boards; however, the nearby coal bunker was decently preserved and still fairly full of coal. I was shocked by what I saw this time. The remains of the station are nearly gone, with only a small section of boards left, and the coal bunker has all but deteriorated. It such an inglorious end for such a beautiful area.

North Lake Station, May 2020.

North Lake Station, May 2020.

North Lake Station, May 2020.

North Lake Station, May 2020.

North Lake Station, May 2020.

North Lake Station, May 2020.

To boost my spirits, I’ve done a few other hikes. I was invited to visit a section of the Grand Trunk Pacific that lies on private property just west of the city. The owner, Howard, uses one part of the grade for his driveway and the other as a recreational trail. Both are kept so well-maintained they appear as though they would have back before this portion of the line was abandoned in 1924.

Grand Trunk Pacific, May 2020.

Grand Trunk Pacific, May 2020.

Since I’ve been at camp the last few weekends, I’ve taken the opportunity to explore more of the former Canadian Northern/CN-Kinghorn grade in the area. I’ve really embraced the whole bike and hike concept on this line (and others). A couple of months ago I bought a new bike and I’ve been putting it to good use. The bike lets me cover ground a lot quicker, and its ideal for areas where the railway grade is easily passable. I have quite a number of these explorations planned for the summer when I’m already in the area.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Kinghorn Sub-Division, May 2020.

Now I do have some exciting news to pass along. I mentioned how disappointed I was with my visit to North Lake, but I actually found something that made up for it and then some. I’m not going to give too many details other than I have something arriving in the mail in the next few weeks that is of great importance to my research on the railway. I’ll post all the details when it shows up.

Anyway, I need to be moving along. I have a hike scheduled for today along the Grand Trunk. It’s to a place I have not been to in along time. I’ll have pictures and info on all my explorations in my next post…and details about my “special” deilvery! Until then…

 
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Posted by on May 30, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway

 

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CNoR/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision MP 109-112 III

Video of the former Canadian Northern Railway/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision east of Pearl, ON. Features the bridge over the Pearl River.

Part 3 of 3.

Active, 1914-2005.

 
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Posted by on May 29, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway, Video

 

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CNoR/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision MP 109-112 II

Video of the former Canadian Northern Railway/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision east of Pearl, ON. Features numerous long embankments and rock cuts and end alongside Pearl Lake,

Part 2 of 3.

Active, 1914-2005.

 
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Posted by on May 28, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway, Video

 

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CNoR/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision MP 109-112 I

Video of the former Canadian Northern Railway/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision east of Pearl, ON. Features a long embankment and rock cut.

Part 1 of 3.

Active, 1914-2005.

 
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Posted by on May 27, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway, Video

 

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CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision MP 112-113

Video of the former Canadian Northern Railway/CN-Kinghorn (Dorion) Subdivision east of Pearl, ON. Features numerous telegraph poles (only one shown) and a length of 1953 rail.

 
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Posted by on May 21, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway, Video

 

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Port Arthur, Duluth & Western Railway MP 71 I

Video of the former railway grade and station at North Lake, ON. North Lake was one of the original stations on the PAD&W line when it opened in 1893. It later saw the additions of a section house, turning wye and coal bunker. The station remains shown in the video was built by Canadian Northern Railway in 1907 and was one of their Third-Class stations. It was abandoned in 1923 and was still standing into the 1970s.

See the 1997 video for comparison (links in the video).

 
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Posted by on May 16, 2020 in Hiking, History, Railway, Video

 

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